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Outcome from today''s hearing!!!

  • jslgb
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03 Oct 12 #359168 by jslgb
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I can imagine how frustrated you are to have had contact progress and then come to a stand still again!

On a positive note, counselling might help discover why your partners son is reluctant to come, and help him be more accepting of it.

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03 Oct 12 #359170 by khan72
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Stepper,
You are correct. (Unless someone else has PR and they try to compete). I cannot remember off hand which judge said this but it went like "rich or poor, the best person to bring up the child is the parent."

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03 Oct 12 #359171 by jslgb
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Can a parent not pass on their PR to a person of their choice ie grandparent or spouse?

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03 Oct 12 #359173 by khan72
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I doubt it. I thought there was a special process to apply for PR. I could be wrong. Also, no one can apply for PR without the knowledge of the current parents. Not sure if they need permission or just need to be informed of the action.
If that ever happened to me, I would ask the court to set aside all orders with respect to Children Act 1989 and job done. I would argue that there is no need for any order so a no order principle applies :)

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03 Oct 12 #359174 by jslgb
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Oh, i thought a parent could write it into their will that their ''share''of PR could be passed on to a named person.

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03 Oct 12 #359175 by khan72
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Lets put it this way... If someone did that with my daughter, they would be in for a surprise. I would simply take my daughter and bring her home. Let the police tell the other party "its a civil matter"...I would then apply to set all orders aside. Job done :)

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03 Oct 12 #359176 by Sjw19850141
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I know in scotland that your spouse can apply for PR and it usually isnt a problem, if I was to die tomorrow my son would be with my parents as there is a non contact order in place as goes NRP , oh and I take issue with the poster who thinks that that RP should "Walk AwAY" if my son was just throwing a wobbly i would but he is genuinely distressed and cannot be left with NRP as noted by curator during contact centre visits! she couldnt even get him into the room the second time!

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