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what age is appropriate?

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01 Sep 12 #353301 by pixy
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I''m with redwine - kids have to learn to cope with being responsible and it''s up to parents to facilitate that learning process. Being on their own for half an hour at an age when many children are travelling on their own to secondary school isn''t a big deal.

  • tinkerbell1606
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01 Sep 12 #353302 by tinkerbell1606
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I believe the law states that a child should not be left unsupervised under the age of 12 in the UK.
Should be easy enough to check?
My ( nearly 12) year old is very sensible & responsible, what if something were to happen to you & you were unable to return for some reason?
I prefer not to leave her at this age anyway,
Tink x

  • survive
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01 Sep 12 #353303 by survive
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thanks all, quite a contraversial topic!

Also, do you think that ex should have discussed first or is it just a case of when children with him, he calls the shots?

Survive

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01 Sep 12 #353313 by Action
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Hi survive, I don''t know the law on this and agree with the others that it depends on how mature the child is, BUT I do feel that it is important for children to have consistency so feel srongly that it is a decision that needs to be agreed between both parents.

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02 Sep 12 #353319 by pixy
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It''s a letting go issue. You and your ex each have to trust each other. I understand why it''s difficult (been there, done that) but I don''t think it''s a big enough issue to get worked up over. It''s just a tiny step in the transition to maturity. Have faith in your child being sensible enough not to burn the house down or let axe murderers through the front door.

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02 Sep 12 #353336 by James53
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I believe the law states that a child should not be left unsupervised under the age of 12 in the UK

If that is true then it shows how dumb the laws are in this country are. Every 11 year old would have to be escorted to school, never be allowed to play with friends unless supervised by a parent.
They are unsupervised for 8 hours a day when the parent sleeps. May be we need a parent awake to stand guard over them why they sleep.
I suppose the acid test would be would HMRC pay child care costs for an 11 year old who attends secondary school.

  • MrsMathsisfun
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02 Sep 12 #353342 by MrsMathsisfun
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I didnt think there is any law about leaving a child unattended. Its just illegal to leave a child in charge of other children.

How did the child react?
Was the child left in charge of other children?

If the child was happy and confident after being left then it was just the next step in their development.

Its really hard as a parent to start letting your child go but once a child starts secondary school its really important they learn to become more independent.

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