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Addressing a Judge

  • tiredandirritated
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15 Oct 12 #361066 by tiredandirritated
Topic started by tiredandirritated
Hi all,

I am about to write a supporting letter to the court stating that I do not agree with the allegations of unreasonable behaviour, but I do agree that the marriage has broken down irretrievably and I wanted to ask for:
A, any pointers on what to say

and B, how do I address a Judge that I have never met so do not know their name or gender?

many thanks

  • rubytuesday
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15 Oct 12 #361070 by rubytuesday
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If it''s a District Judge, Deputy District Judge or a Magistrate then you would address them as "Sir" or "Madam".

When writing, either put Dear Judge [Name], or Dear Sir or Madam if you don''t know their name.

Why are you writing a letter to the Court, rather than using the Acknowledgement of Service to say that you wish to defend the allegations, but consent to the divorce (apologies if you have explained this elsewhere, and I''ve missed it)

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15 Oct 12 #361072 by tiredandirritated
Reply from tiredandirritated
Thank you Rubytuesday

I was going to attach it to the D10 as I was going to put I am not defending this but the reasons that my stbx has listed are lies so I wanted to just say that I agree to the divorce but not to the un proven allegations and also my stbx has listed her son on the D8 and he is 23 and not lived with us for about 3 years either so I was going to make them aware of this as I did my stbx solicitor but they just issued it unchanged.
Is this the right way about doing it as I have been advised by lots of people not to bother issuing a cross Petition or defending it as it would not be worth it?

regards

  • dukey
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15 Oct 12 #361076 by dukey
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Its not wise to write to court, it tends just to complicate the matter.

Write to the Petitioner or their solicitor if they have one, state you refute all allegations raised in the statement of case but will sign the AoS if they undertake not to raise the allegations at any future proceedings and will agree costs form the outset.

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15 Oct 12 #361086 by tiredandirritated
Reply from tiredandirritated
Hi Dukey

I have done that and they sent back a letter just stating that their client stands by all allegations made and have not even talked about costs although I did say I would agree if they change the allegations and agreed to pay their costs.

rock and a hard place :(

  • .Charles
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15 Oct 12 #361111 by .Charles
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For reference, when writing to a judge by letter or email, ''dear Judge'' is perfectly acceptable.

Charles

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15 Oct 12 #361113 by rubytuesday
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.Charles wrote:

For reference, when writing to a judge by letter or email, ''dear Judge'' is perfectly acceptable.

Charles


Thanks Charles :)

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