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What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


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Written Submissions

  • Neophyte
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20 Sep 12 #356999 by Neophyte
Topic started by Neophyte
Is it possible to submit a full written argument over and above a skeleton argument for the judge to consider. I have a preference to present my case in writing rather than verbally so I can ensure completeness. I have read in various judgements about written submissions, is this the same thing or is it limited to specific issues?

  • TBagpuss
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27 Sep 12 #358189 by TBagpuss
Reply from TBagpuss
written submissions are somoetimes made instead of verbal ones, this is often the case where there is an issue of complex law.

The difficulty is that normally your submissions would take into account the evidence given, so it''s generally only appropraite where it is practical to go away and draw up submissions after the hearing, before the Judge makes a decision.

What you can do, however, is to prepare detailed notes for yourself which you can then refer to when you are making submissions. I would advise against writing it all out in longhand as this does not tend to come across well, but instead make notes of the main points you want to make, with sub-points if necessary, Print it out with double of treble line spacing so that if new information comes out during the hearing you have space to add extra notes, and also cross things out if the Judge makes it clear that something is not relevant.


All of this lets you have your submissions pmostly porepared, in a logical, organise order, but allows you to add or remove as necessary to take account of what is said during the hearing.

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