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What constitutes \"Unreasonable Behaviour\"?

  • rubytuesday
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27 Jan 08 #12024 by rubytuesday
Topic started by rubytuesday
Can anyone give me expamples of what constitutes sunreasonable behaviour please. I intend to use this as the reason for divorce. I know that I will have to give 3 or 4 examples of his unreasonalbe behaviour. Do they have to be major events (like the time I discovered he had been veiwing explict porn online), or can they be small, continuning events, like lack of maritail relations, dereliction of family life because he chose to spend his time drinking?

  • scottishlady
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27 Jan 08 #12026 by scottishlady
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I think the two examples you have given already would be 'acceptable' to use...
I don't think they have to be 'major' events.... just reasonable/plausible reasons...

  • rubytuesday
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27 Jan 08 #12027 by rubytuesday
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Thanks, that's what I thought. The accumilation of small, everyday events that made life unbearable is what I had in mind, I also thought that I could use the facts that he has depression which he refuses to get treated, and refusing all help to treat his drinking problem (which he blames me for). I had hoped not to go down this road, but after the letter he sent me last week, where he warns me not to take advantage of his finaces and that he has supported me and my kids for 4 years (the length of our marriage) made me realise that he wasn't going to be civil. I understand him wanting his share of the house money, it is rightfully his, but I won't be bullied or harrassed like he was doing via his letter.

  • Frenchconnection
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27 Jan 08 #12033 by Frenchconnection
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My UB petition has just been granted Decree Nisi by the court and I completed the petition myself. If you PM me with your email I can send you what I wrote.

  • gone1
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27 Jan 08 #12037 by gone1
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As Scottish lady said. U have 2 reasons. They dont have to be major. The hard bit as you will find out is getting the petition back and signed. Have you spoke to your ex about it? I made up my reasons for my ex as she didnt have anything that she could do me on. So what I did was chose opposites. What respondents find hard is seeing the reasons in black and white on paper. That according to my sol is what causes the problem so if you could get his input that will be better. If not just do just enough. At the end of the day you just want to get your divorce with the minimum fuss. Thats the end game. Good luck. Chris.

  • Josh2008
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27 Jan 08 #12061 by Josh2008
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As long as you state in paragraph 12 of the petition

"The respondent has behaved in such a way that the petitioner cannot reasonably be expected to live with the respondent"

And in paragraph 13

Give a generalisation of the behavior and some recent examples, which can be mild, that is acceptable to the court, you must also state the last event and approximate date

Try if possible to get the respondent to agree what you intend to say, if he/she doesn’t then it can get messy and costly

In all probability the court will grant a decree, even if contested/defended

I do urge you to get the respondent to agree, but if that is not possible, go ahead with it anyway

  • puffafish
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27 Jan 08 #12068 by puffafish
Reply from puffafish
It can cover anything. I'm divorcing my husband for his violent outbursts and complete indifference throughout my pregnancy amongst other things. He's contesting this and has put in his own petition where the juciest thing he could come up with was my "giving him a nasty look."
Good luck!

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