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Will This Happen???

  • Sera
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09 Oct 07 #4502 by Sera
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It means, you could be liable for his costs. (His sols fees), I doubt that would happen. I thought the courts expected each party to pay their own, but in my non-mol / conduct case, if I lose, I've been told I'll have to pay his sols.

Anyway, if you don't want him back, then go with the Order, (my ex applied 17th Sept, got first Hearing within a week (25th Sept). Going back Nov. That's the time scale here, although they'd probably sort it at the first meeting.

My guess is, he's had his fun, that got a bit too real for him (ie: Honeymoon period over!), and the realisation that he'd miss being home for Xmas, means he'll probably waltz in with a box of Frero Rochas, and wanting his Scotts Porridge Oats!

(Mark my words Hen!)

Of course, if you do want him back, that's your choice, but don't let him use you.

  • scottishlady
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09 Oct 07 #4504 by scottishlady
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Thanks Sera...
Yes, I was of the understanding that 'usually' each party pays for their own costs re divorce..
it's when 'the other stuff' comes into play that costs become an issue... ie, ancillary relief etc....

Lol.... want him back?.... want him back?....
Not on your nellie !!!!!:angry:

If the silly old sod prefers a taste of Lancashire Hotpot as opposed to Scott's Porridge Oats... he can eat away to his hearts content!!!!:laugh:

  • gone1
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09 Oct 07 #4514 by gone1
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I think costs come into play where there is a winner and loser. Except divorce. Provided the divorce is un contested than the respondant does not normaly pay the pettioners costs. Ancilory relief is another matter. There are no winners and loosers. Just loosers so costs are not an issue. Its knock for knock. But cases like non mol etc, do have a clear winner and looser. In that case the looser pays the winners costs.

In my non mol becuase I signed an undertaking (a promise) and I was not persued for costs. But they could have.

I think its a bit crap realy. I was dragged into court and I could have a costs award against me. In my case I did nothing wrong and her whole intention was to get the occupancy order for the FMH. She failed in this action. All she got was a promise that I would not come within 50 meters of the FMH until January 3rd. I think the courts system in this country is pants. Chris

  • Sera
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09 Oct 07 #4516 by Sera
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Karen,

Like Chris says, you could drag ex to court for the Order for him not to come near the home. (Usually they attach a timeframe, Chris' is not allowed to Jan 3rd).

However, is he only planning the two week stay over Xmas?

If that's the case, then your costs to your sol in these matters, and your represntation in Court with a Barrister will cost over £1,000

So, for that, I'd rather just shunt off for a Carribean holiday at Xmas! It's your call.

If you're looking to get an order, then self-rep and do it on-the-cheap.

  • sexysadie
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09 Oct 07 #4518 by sexysadie
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Hm, Karen, not sure whether I agree with Sera here. If it were my husband I'd be worried about him then deciding that he would just stay around afterwards and that I would never get him out again.

Good luck,

Sadie

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09 Oct 07 #4519 by Sera
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Agreed Sadie! I just thought Mr.Scottishlady had elsewhere to live, but couldn't be there for a few weeks.

On hindsight, I think you're right, it could be he was trying to get back home, then sit parked up!

My ex was staying away a lot, (leaving house in new undies and aftershave...) Then when I told his sol he appears to have elsewhere to stay, she obviously told him to come home more often, (since he's trying to get rid of me).

Maybe Karen, your ex's sol has suggested he come back?
Who knows what he's angling for in his action?

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