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A good book for my 5 year old?

  • Newlife2009
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12 years 1 month ago #76605 by Newlife2009
Topic posted by Newlife2009
If anybody looks at this page anymore (it) does seem a bit neglected) I am looking for a children's book suitable for a 5 year old girl that would help her understand what is happening in her life.

I intend to start her on counselling (even if she seems to be coping well at the moment) but would like to re-inforce this at home.

NLx

  • perrypower
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12 years 1 month ago #76607 by perrypower
Reply from perrypower
Try a book called, \"Two of Everything\".

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12 years 1 month ago #76635 by Elle
Reply from Elle
Hi NL

Hi Have you tried an internet search. There are many sites dedicated to helping children regards parents separating etc....which give contacts and book list. Its not an area I am familiar with but I am sure someone will be along soon enough to add to perrys suggestion...so keep poppin back to your post.

Elle

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12 years 1 month ago #76650 by D L
Reply from D L
Hi there

The Cafcass workbook \"My Family is Changing\" (younger version) is in the Wiki library as a pdf and is a fabulous resource. Whole heartedly recommend this one.

And just a note re counselling. If she is coping, think about whether she needs it.

Amanda

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12 years 1 month ago #76655 by Fiona
Reply from Fiona
I would second Amanda. In most circumstances the best 'counsellor' for young children are 'educated' parents.

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12 years 1 month ago #76656 by perrypower
Reply from perrypower
I agree with Amanda. If she is coping, don't throw counselling at her. My six year old has done just fine. My 11 year old struggled a bit more, but then mentioned he found everyone asking him how he was all the time the hardest bit...

They just need to know that both parents love them as people keep saying.

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12 years 1 month ago #76917 by Newlife2009
Reply from Newlife2009
Thanks for the suggestions.

Re the couselling, I'm happy that I will do my best not to use her as a weapon in all this but stbx will use her without realising what he is doing (maybe it is him that needs the counselling...) furthermore he will probably try and make out that I am using her.

I just worry about taking something as perfect as out little girl and turningher into something as twisted as her father (and grandparents for that matter).

I will take your advice and see how things go for now.

Thanks again, this site is invaluable I have already recommended it to many others!

NLx

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