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What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Do you need help going to court over a Financial Settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support for people who are going to court over a fair financial settlement, for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


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  • shirleylane
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20 Feb 08 #14459 by shirleylane
Topic started by shirleylane
I am initial processes of my second divorce (doesn't that sound awful) -but the first time I was married for 20 years and it was an amicable divorce really because we had just grown apart - this time its a different case and although its not to accrimonious things seem to much more complicated. my solicitor seems to complicate matters and never explains fully what she is doing, sending me out copious forms and letters almost on a daily basis. It now seems to be getting out of hand and I am panicking about how much I am going to owe. Seeing the solicitor now seems worse than continuing with my marriage! My husband has been pretty fair about finances and wants to pay a one off payment so we can just get on with our lives - it all seems fair to me and I know he will pay up - so that's not an issue - but to try to convince my solicitor of this and to stop her pumping out volumes of unnecessary paperwork, which has now started to upset both myself and my husband is driving me mad. At one point I even suggested to the solicitor that I cancel the divorce (as my husband wasn't particularly bothered anyway - and I moved out) because of all this red tape but she ignored me and continued the process. Has anyone else had this problem?
It's driving me mad...

  • hostee
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20 Feb 08 #14460 by hostee
Reply from hostee
The soliciotor works on your behalf not the other way round, dont get caught up in making a amicable situation between you and your x into an acrimonious one becaue of the solicitor, you can do your divorce on line and cut them out completly. Go and see your solicitor and terminate the contract based on misrepresentation.

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20 Feb 08 #14480 by shirleylane
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thanks for that advice but how can I be sure of these on line divorces either - I have heard some horror stories where the price starts out at say £235 and then just goes from bad to worse with 'extra's' being added. I've looked at couple and they don't even mention the severance of tenancy or property division or even access to children etc. I assume that once you get in there with these on line ones and have started to pay up with your credit card all these extras are then 'mentioned' to you...sounds worse than where I am at now... perhaps I am just being pessimistic but I went back to the solicitor and told her to her face (and in writing) that I only wanted her to deal with 'WHAT I HAD ASKED HER TO' and not 'WHAT SHE FELT LIKE' I also reminded her she was employed by me and NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND. She then said she felt she was giving me good advice (she might have been she never explains herself in clear ordinary english - and I'm not thick 'or am I'). She said if I was not going to take her advice then i would have to sign an indemnity form. Yes, I said let's do that then anything to stop you doing unnecessary work - the form never arrived. Only more unnecessary paperwork dropping through the door at both my own and my husbands homes.
Phew.. can't say I necessarily want an answer to this but wanted to get it off my chest...

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20 Feb 08 #14482 by hostee
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Always good to get it off your chest, and we are all happy to listen. I would drop this solicitor or ask to see another within the firm. Then have a list with you of what you want them to do for you to get closure on the items outstanding and get a fixed price for doing these things.
good luck wish mine was amicable.

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20 Feb 08 #14542 by chillygirl
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I'm sorry to hear you are having such troubles.
I would say ask for another solicitor, cos this one clearly doesnt seem to be helping you, more hindering you!

I suppose you are entitled to have another, cant see why you should be made to keep one you dont find helpful ( it is you paying for a servie after all)
Good luck

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