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Help me change family law for the better.

  • Lawchanger
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04 Nov 11 #296134 by Lawchanger
Topic started by Lawchanger
Sorry for making my first posting here a bit of a crusade, but having gone through the experience of watching my daughter suffer the emotional child abuse that is Parental Alienation i thought i MUST do something. I have the FULL support of many M.P.'s in ALL the main parties and even some Judges.
So please, if you are resident in the U.K. and wish to stop your children suffering the emotional child abuse of Parental Alienation

Click on the Link epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/19536
and sign the Petition.
Or copy and paste into your search bar epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/19536

We have 12 months to get the signatures up to over 100,000 and then the matter WILL be debated in Parliament.
In the meantime i will continue my Cross Party Political Lobbying in order to assure that all those in government when it gets to be debated vote to introduce a NEW FAMILY LAW.

Thank you all and please for your Children's sake stay calm and positive.

  • gerimine
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04 Nov 11 #296169 by gerimine

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04 Nov 11 #296179 by .Charles
Reply from .Charles
It would probably help if you defined 'Parental Alienation'. The term is ambiguos at best.

Charles

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04 Nov 11 #296186 by Lawchanger
Reply from Lawchanger
Indeed Charles, i take your point,
however the term Parental Alienation is fully defined in the petition

Thank you for your response.

D.

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04 Nov 11 #296189 by Lawchanger
Reply from Lawchanger
However you will need to copy and paste the link i wrote on the original post

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04 Nov 11 #296194 by .Charles
Reply from .Charles
I finally found the link which went back to the petiton :)

I'm not convinced. The current system is far from perfect but it criminalising parental alienation would over complicate things.

I could imagine a situation where the resident parent acts legitimately to exclude the non resident parent e.g. if they were a habitual drug user, but would be accused of parental alienation. Presumably, they would have to plead guilty on the grounds that they *were* preventing contact from taking place in order to protect the child.

In order not to fall foul of this new law, the resident parent would feel compelled to allow contact to take place but if that contact was perceived to be a risk by Social Services the child may be made the subject of a care order by the local authority. The residence parent would be stuck between a rock and a hard place – allow contact and face Social Services or prevent contact and be guilty of parental alienation.

Such an offence would fly in the face of the Children Act as that Act often allows courts to prevent contact where it is not in the best interests of the children.

Charles

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04 Nov 11 #296205 by Fiona
Reply from Fiona
You say "it [PA] occurs when one parent seeks to remove the other parent and his or her family from having any contact with their child" and it is emotional child abuse. Others say it is more complicated than that, there are many reasons why children are alienated and denigration isn't necessary. See "A Guide to the Parental Alienation Syndrome” Dr Kirk Weir (Consultant Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatrist) which revises PA and I believe is available on the Families Need Fathers website.

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