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What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Do you need help sorting out a fair financial settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support to help you reach agreement on a fair financial settlement quickly, and for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


Consent Order: How watertight?

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11 Jun 12 #336052 by dukey
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I suppose some solicitors won''t be mad keen on fixed price services, but if you used wiki your order will be drafted by a very experienced sicitor who probably write more orders in a week than a high street solicitor would write in a month or more, as long as they are drafted by a solicitor your fine, high street 6-800 quid wiki 139, which is why I used wiki, and trust my order is watertight.

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11 Jun 12 #336053 by Action
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Sounds like your solicitor is after more work! If you''re worried you couls always ask him what he would charge to give it the ''once over'' and make sure there aren''t any possible loopholes.

I had a similar problem with my Mediator saying that, even though we had agreed to the split, we were a long way off getting to the Consent Order stage. It didn''t actually take much effort for my solicitor to tie up all the ends and make it a proper Consent Order, adding things that jus thadn''t occured to me.

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11 Jun 12 #336055 by mcvw
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Personally, I think the solicitor was after more work.

I say this as they very casually commented that they''d require a £2000 ''retainer'' prior to taking on my case.

They estimated (provided that this was a straight through/cut-n-dry case) that for them to ''fill any gaps'' in my consent order - and to answer questions/correspond on my behalf I could expect a final invoice close to that of the retainer they had already requested.

To say my hackles were up was an understatement!

Don''t get me wrong, I''m not anti-solicitors or anything, but at a time when all you want is basic sound advice and ''next steps'' you really don''t want to hear the likes of £2k upfront before they do anything :(

I think the best option is that once (IF!) the ex completes the forms I''ll call the helpline of the firm that the consent order was bought via and ask their advice.

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11 Jun 12 #336058 by dukey
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What gaps, 2k is a lot of money and you have already paid a solicitor, I think I would be calling wiki or the solicitor who drafted the order before I even thought about shelling out 2k.

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11 Jun 12 #336060 by mcvw
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The only ''gaps'' I can think of would be regarding my pensions.

Neither of us have any additional assets/savings etc other than the FMH.

My ex has said she wants no share of any pensions, and that she simply wants a 50/50 equity split (all this was after she saw a solicitor who advised her to pursue an 80/20 split!).

So it just remains for her to complete the forms and it to be submitted to the court (via the wiki solicitors).

Simples! (not!!!) :)

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11 Jun 12 #336062 by dukey
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Well it is simple if you both agree bit it seems as though your ex is back tracking a bit, fixed price services are for those who agree not those that argue, it must be a real pain for you, thankfully my ex did the d81 signed the order and that was that.

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11 Jun 12 #336067 by Action
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£2k sounds an awful lot if you have agreed but if you''re going to be fighting through the solicotors then it''s the ''tip of the iceberg''.

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