A well respected, award winning social enterprise
Volunteer run - Government and charity funded
We help 50,000 people a year through divorce

01202 805020

Lines open: Monday to Friday 9am-5pm
Call for FREE expert advice & service info


What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Do you need help sorting out a fair financial settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support to help you reach agreement on a fair financial settlement quickly, and for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


How long to write a consent order

  • Under60
  • Under60's Avatar Posted by
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500792 by Under60
Topic started by Under60
I accepted an offer, so long as it was drawn up quickly by the exes solicitor.
One arrrived about two weeks later. There were spelling mistakes and missing out completely what they had offered originally.
My solicitor wrote back with the corrections.
This is now 6 weeks later.
How do I get them to speed up?
At this rate I may as well just hold on for the final hearing in 6 weeks time and get a much fairer amount.

  • NoMoreMrs
  • NoMoreMrs's Avatar
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500795 by NoMoreMrs
Reply from NoMoreMrs
It took my exes solicitor five months to draft a simple Consent Order. My solicitor was appalled by this and said she normally aims to draft this type of consent order within a few weeks.

We also had many mistakes which took their solicitor 3 weeks to reply with the amended Consent Order. My solicitor usually leaves it 3 weeks before she starts chasing them.

I guess it depends on how much needs to change and whether they agree with the amendments. They might be waiting for the final hearing.

I hope all goes well for you, its very frustrating waiting for the other side. :angry::angry:

  • Under60
  • Under60's Avatar Posted by
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500797 by Under60
Reply from Under60
His solicitors are the most useless people ever.
They cannot even spell the names correctly.
They muddled up applicant and respondent.
I’m sure I could have written a better one myself.
I only agreed if it was done quickly, and would all be sorted and paid before the FH. As it’s taking so long I might as well just go to the final hearing and get a much nearer to half amount. :)

  • NoMoreMrs
  • NoMoreMrs's Avatar
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500798 by NoMoreMrs
Reply from NoMoreMrs
It's probably for the best! My solicitor has been amazing but the ex and his solicitor have done and said some questionable things.

  • elizadoolittle
  • elizadoolittle's Avatar
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500801 by elizadoolittle
Reply from elizadoolittle
Just one more example, I'm afraid (there have been many for me) that agreeing to something in the hope of your ex doing something is an exercise in futility and aggravation. I agreed to all kinds of things, the Consent Order took forever, he ratted on all kinds of things, and now that we have a consent order he ignores it anyway.

I guess he takes the attitude 'what's she going to do about it?' and sadly, this is all too common, especially where one is divorcing someone who can manipulate their own affairs (ie, significantly, is not an employee).

My ex used to say 'possession is nine tenths of the law' and it certainly seems to be the maxim he lives by.

Problem is, what can you do but wait? Refuse to sign if it suits you if the document is produced before the trial. Or go to trial. It brings up again the feelings of impotent rage that I remember so well.

Try not to let it get to you - easier said than done, I know - and take some comfort from the fact that at least you have an alternative method of resolution looming. Good luck!

  • Under60
  • Under60's Avatar Posted by
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
17 Apr 18 #500802 by Under60
Reply from Under60
Thanks, yeah that’s exactly how it is. It still seems to be the power and control trip....I have everything, you are getting nothing, then finds out he has to give me something, so likes to delay and prolong everything to show he is in charge of me still.
Not for much longer
I will be free :)

Moderators: wikivorce teamrubytuesdaydukeyhadenoughnowTetsSheziLinda SheridanForsetiMitchumWhiteRoseLostboy67WYSPECIALBubblegum11