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Univeral Credit and Periodical payments

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30 Jan 14 #420674 by maisymoos
Topic started by maisymoos
In another post recently there was a discussion regarding Universal Credit. Spousal maintenance under the new system apparently counts as income. There was also mention that if you have a global order it may not? The wording in my Court Order states periodical payments of £x for the benefit of Respondant and children, and does not separate child v''s spousal. Will this count?

The judge calculated the amount I would receive in line with my income needs after taking the CTC I receive into account Therefore if I lose CTC the my income each month will be in significant short fall.

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30 Jan 14 #420675 by u6c00
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At the moment the answer is "your guess is as good as mine."

There''s no mechanism as far as I can tell for assessing which part of a global order will be counted and which part will be disregarded as CM. I was on a course this afternoon and the instructor was the one who taught the UC course. He couldn''t answer your question either.

One thing is certain, if you currently claim any of the benefits which are to be replaced by UC then you will enjoy ''transitional protection'' which means you will not be worse off under UC. This should continue to be the case for 7 years or until you have a significant change in circumstances.

It''s also worth pointing out that UC is being phased in gradually and at this stage it seems unlikely that complex cases will be transferred in the next year or two.

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30 Jan 14 #420711 by maisymoos
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Thank you so much for your your quick response. Is the 7 year transitional period in documentation anywhere? Started to panic a bit today. Have just got a small job that I can fit around my children.. but pays very little :-(. Just want to ensure Im not suddenly put in financial dire straits with no warning.

Thanks again was hoping "Uc006" would respond :)

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30 Jan 14 #420720 by u6c00
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Yep, I''m not sure where the 7 years comes in, except that it was the timescale that the course instructor said today. The details of the transitional protection can be found in this briefing note from the DWP.

Transitional Protection

How many hours is your job, as it may be relevant for how long the transitional protection applies?

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31 Jan 14 #420757 by maisymoos
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Thank you earnings minimal only 6 hours a week at minimum wage it''s also only a temp contract, and does not effect the amount of CTC I currently receive.

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31 Jan 14 #420759 by u6c00
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It''s quite complicated but under UC you''ll have to fulfill a claimant commitment, similar to how JSA works now.

This works by assigning you a number of hours that you might be expected to work, which is likely to be:
0 hours for parents with a child under 1
16 hours for parents with a child between 1 and 5
up to 35 hours for parents with a child over 5 BUT you''ll only be expected to be looking for work with hours that fit around school (including drop off and collection), so in reality for most people you can take this to be 16-24.

They''ll then multiply your expected number of hours by national minimum wage. That''s your expected income. If you are below that then you''ll be expected to try and increase your income.

The reason why this is relevant is one of the reasons that you might lose transitional protection is:

• a sustained (3 month) earnings drop beneath the level of work that is
expected of them according to their claimant commitment;

Now there''s some argument about whether you would have a "drop" if you weren''t working when UC came in but I think you''re on risky ground. I''m sorry if this is not welcome news, but it''s something that''s worth bearing in mind and preparing for if you can.

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31 Jan 14 #420763 by maisymoos
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I think I understand what you are saying, Does they work commitment of x hours also apply to school holidays? I have been looking for a term time/school hour job for quite sometime and they are like gold dust.

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