A well respected, award winning social enterprise
Volunteer run - Government and charity funded
We help 50,000 people a year through divorce

01202 805020

Lines open: Monday to Friday 9am-5pm
Call for FREE expert advice & service info


What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Do you need help sorting out a fair financial settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support to help you reach agreement on a fair financial settlement quickly, and for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


Probable outcome?

  • Saucy minx
  • Saucy minx's Avatar Posted by
  • Junior Member
  • Junior Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13476 by Saucy minx
Topic started by Saucy minx
Hello, my husband of 28 years left just over a year ago. He earns about £35,000 and I work part time and earn £9500 per annum. For the first year he paid all the bills including the mortgage, insurances and council tax plus the gas, electric, water, telephone and television. Now he has stopped paying all the bills except for the mortage, coucil tax and insurances. We want to get a divorce but does he still have to pay all the bills until that time and what will be the probable outcome with our house which is worth about £190,000. In addition, am I entitled to any of his pension which is currently valued at about 145,000. He hopes for a 'Clean Break' divorce.

  • TMax
  • TMax's Avatar
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13478 by TMax
Reply from TMax
No bills do not have to be paid, your earning so are responsable for the items you use, you may be entitled to benfits to help you with your housold expenses. CAB can advise you.

Basicly put everything worth over £500 money including pay into bog pot let it simmer take out all debts and start at 50/50. I take it the figure you gave is the sum they say the pension is worth not just a guessed assessment, read the pension blogs and youl get an idea of what the share may be.

  • maggie
  • maggie's Avatar
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13479 by maggie
Reply from maggie

  • Saucy minx
  • Saucy minx's Avatar Posted by
  • Junior Member
  • Junior Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13501 by Saucy minx
Reply from Saucy minx
Our children are grown up, but my 28 year old son lives at home with me at present and does pay board. I have just found out that my husband does not pay council tax and my son is named as living with me.

  • mike62
  • mike62's Avatar
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13503 by mike62
Reply from mike62
Saucy Minx,

Below is a bit pinched from another posting which would enable someone to give you an idea of probable outcome - fill in the blanks, and someone will be able to give you an idea. With a name like yours, there will be a queue! ;)


Take care

Mike


Basic financial details to help others consider your position

H age
Net income a year £35,000 (Nett or gross?)

Should he be working O/T or can he realistically maximise his earning potential –if so what would the net income be a year
Health issues which affect ability to work?

W age
Net income a year £9,500 (Nett or Gross?)
Should she be working O/T or can he realistically maximise his earning potential –if so what would the net income be a year
Health issues which affect ability to work?

What do you think you can raise by way of mortgage?
How much can you afford for housing a month?

State benefits?
Working Tax Credits

Other benefits state per year

W savings
H savings

Debts

W debts
H debts
of the above how much do you accept are Matrimonial debts

Any adverse credit history affecting you or H getting a mortgage/loan

Any inheritance likely;
H £ parents aged?
W £ parents aged?

Any serious likelihood of either within 5 years?

Pensions

W CETV?
H CETV? £145,000
Either in payment?

  • Saucy minx
  • Saucy minx's Avatar Posted by
  • Junior Member
  • Junior Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13507 by Saucy minx
Reply from Saucy minx
Thanks,

All incomes are gross.

Could be some health issues regarding his job as it is very manual and he does have back issues.

I could work full time if I looked for an alternative place to work.

Not sure how much I could raise for a mortgage - depends on what I receive from the house sale.

Not applied for tax credits/benefits yet.

We have some savings (joint) - about £5000.

I have some credit card debts. He paid off my other credit card debts when he left!

He has a mother who has her own house, but she is fit and well and only 69. He is the only child though.

I have a small pension which was frozen when I changed jobs and went part time. He has alway contributed to a pension (final salary pension).

  • mike62
  • mike62's Avatar
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
11 Feb 08 #13513 by mike62
Reply from mike62
Forgot to ask market value of house and outstanding mortgage, and hence equity

Mike

Moderators: wikivorce teamrubytuesdaydukeyhadenoughnowTetsSheziLinda SheridanForsetiMitchumWhiteRoseLostboy67WYSPECIALBubblegum11