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What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Online divorce

  • Peter123
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12 Sep 07 #3231 by Peter123
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Hi,
reading through the postings, I can see that I am not alone in wanting a "starting poing/ballpark" figure from a solicitor.

I found a very good value for money solicitor via an online web site.

£40 and 1 hours chatting with very good female solicitor and I now have a ballpark figure, understand the process and can start talking to my x2be about the next step.

I am happy to send URL and name of the solicitor that I spoke to, if any one would like to try it.

regards
Peter123

  • evergreen2253
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15 Sep 07 #3399 by evergreen2253
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Be sure you clarify the finances and get a Clean Break and Consent Order - you may be able to do this yourself, but don't leave open ends - they cab haunt you, and leave you open to continual claims after the divorce has been settled.

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15 Sep 07 #3400 by evergreen2253
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I had a child support query which was clarified for me inside of 20 minutes by a lady solicitor, who said she felt it wasn't necesscary for me even to engage her professional services. The upshot of it was that I was and am paying too much, and can reduce it.

It was impartial advice - with no attempt to turn it into a fishing expedition for fees.

  • Sera
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15 Sep 07 #3434 by Sera
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I had a good £40 an hour session with a senior partner in a law firm, on-line. Apparently though, had I visited him at his office, I'd have been entitled to this 'consultation' for free. I think on-line is good if you have one direct question that can be advised on in the allocated time. But I wasted £45 by using an on-line service that promised to download my 'home rights' application, (which I could've done for free myself through the Land Registrys website.
The Land Registry came back saying there was a 'complication', and the on-line people e-mailed to say they were unsuccessful in helping me, and told me to seek a soliciotrs advice. They refused to refund my £45.00, and would not help further..... so I ended up at a solicitors anyway! (£565.00) for her to deal with my marital homerights application. It appears the complication was that my husbands late-wifes name was still on the Deed of our maritrimonial home, and they hadn't been notified of her death.

So, just be warned, from experience, if there are complications, you'll end up paying twice!

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