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What are we each entitled to in our divorce settlement?

What does the law say about how to split the house, how to share pensions and other assets, and how much maintenance is payable.

What steps can we take to reach a fair agreement?

The four basic steps to reaching an agreement on divorce finances are: disclosure, getting advice, negotiating and implementing a Consent Order.

What is a Consent Order and why do we need one?

A Consent Order is a legally binding document that finalises a divorcing couple's agreement on property, pensions and other assets.


Do you need help sorting out a fair financial settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support to help you reach agreement on a fair financial settlement quickly, and for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


How much confidence

  • Jo1234
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04 Mar 17 #489610 by Jo1234
Topic started by Jo1234
Hello, here is a question

The reason I ask is my situation now means I will end up going down the court route which I thought would be avoided. My ex wants and is adamant on a 50/50 split and would be happy to spend £10k just for the hell of it.

If my solicitor is correct and can get me x / x then it's worth me going to court.

On a 50/50 split my ex would be laughing all the way to the bank and force me to sell my house.

My solicitor has an excellent reputation and I can't see him saying he can achieve something if he couldn't. But at the back of mind is the knowledge they all have to make a living and if representing my ex would he be saying the same thing.

  • WYSPECIAL
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04 Mar 17 #489612 by WYSPECIAL
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Your solicitor is presumably basing their statement on their experience and knowledge and is fully equipped with all your circumstances.

Without any information about incomes, assets, ages, children and length of marriage no one can comment on what might be fair.

How much difference is there between the 50% your ex wants to agree and the 60% you want?

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04 Mar 17 #489613 by Bubblegum11
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I would only add that your solicitor only has your version of the case at this stage. If matters go to court and final hearing your ex will put forward their best argument and evidence. I'm sure your solicitor has made his/her judgement with objectivity but surely they do not have both sides of the case to predict such a certain outcome at this stage.

How much does the 10% that is disputed equate to in monetary terms?

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04 Mar 17 #489617 by Jo1234
Reply from Jo1234
Thanks for reply, we are looking at around £70k

He will get enough to be housed mortgage free. No kids involved. Him good salary me not so good. No pension. He has 16 years of work left. Also potential to earn a lot more.

My solicitor does seem very confident, my ex has been very uncooperative his solicitor asked for voluntary form E exchange in July mine was done, still not had his.

I think I just had a bit of a panic and should trust his judgement.

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04 Mar 17 #489620 by Bubblegum11
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Well if it's that clear cut then I can see why your solicitor has stated such a split can be achieved. What do you expect your legal costs to be if matters proceed to a final hearing? £70k may seem like it's worth going to court but remember to deduct each of your costs from the maritial pot. If you end up each spending £30k fully represented all the way to a FH think about how that may affect what is left for division. All I'm saying is don't let the costs snowball out of control if you go to court.

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