A well respected, award winning social enterprise
Volunteer run - Government and charity funded
We help 50,000 people a year through divorce

01202 805020

Lines open: Monday to Friday 9am-5pm
Call for FREE expert advice & service info

Do you need help sorting out a fair financial settlement?

Our consultant service offers expert advice and support to help you reach agreement on a fair financial settlement quickly, and for less than a quarter of the cost of using a traditional high street solicitor.


Here comes the cavalry...........

  • rubytuesday
  • rubytuesday's Avatar
  • Moderator
  • Moderator
More
08 May 12 #329167 by rubytuesday
Reply from rubytuesday
I might be wrong, but I thought direct instruction was more for those who are self-repping, rather than using a fixed price service?

  • dukey
  • dukey's Avatar
  • Moderator
  • Moderator
More
08 May 12 #329184 by dukey
Reply from dukey
Sorry Maggie we seem to have gone of topic a bit, ill make this my last post.

For many years a lay person or litigant in person as they are known could instruct a barrister without a solicitor, but not for a family matter, there are good reasons why this was the case, one is that family law is quite complicated compared to other law, tax for example is black and white, there are rules and calculations that are fixed, family law is more shades of grey open to interpretation.

Not that long ago as Fiona said the powers that be decided Joe public should be able to instruct a barrister without a solicitor, how wise this is has and is fiercely debated, many think it saves money, but does it? often its false economy, solicitors know how to brief the barrister and exactly what work they are asking them to carry out, us the great unwashed could miss a trick or be unaware of what can and cannot be asked.

Ive forgotten what the question was :huh:time to slink off me thinks.

  • maggie
  • maggie's Avatar Posted by
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
More
08 May 12 #329243 by maggie
Reply from maggie
All very interesting - hard to keep up with the new legal landscape.
I suppose I''m just shocked that these prices are supposed to be competitive.......
The old idea was that barristers were cheaper than a solicitor for an FDR - rate for the job as opposed to hourly rate?

  • dukey
  • dukey's Avatar
  • Moderator
  • Moderator
More
08 May 12 #329245 by dukey
Reply from dukey
That''s right Maggie barristers charge a brief fee, so a payment for a peice of work rather than by the hour,so yes it can actually work out cheaper to use a barrister in some cases.

Moderators: wikivorce teamrubytuesdaydukeyhadenoughnowTetsSheziLinda SheridanForsetiMitchumWhiteRoseLostboy67WYSPECIALBubblegum11